Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea): Revise global status?

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2 Responses to Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea): Revise global status?

  1. Thomas Martin says:

    The re-assessment of this species (in light of recent taxonomic updates) as Critically Endangered is undoubtably correct – the species remains an extremely high conservation priority. Perhaps even more so than before, given the relatively large population on Sumba is now split off as its own species.

    As above, I am in full agreement with the proposed assessment. I just have two additional comments which may add some extra information for this assessment.

    1) It may be worth noting that, as far as I am aware, no further records of this species have been made on Buton Island since the 2009 sighting reported in Martin et al. (2012). Thus I do not think the species has been reliably observed here for 12 years now.

    2) An overview of records of this species in the Tukangbesi/Wakatobi Islands was recently published by O’Connell et al. (2020). (An assessment of the avifauna of the Wakatobi Islands, South-east Sulawesi, Indonesia: species recorded and taxonomic considerations). Here, the presence of this species is reported from three small islands, although the exact names and locations of these islands are witheld, given the vulnerability of the species to trappers (who may use scientific literature to locate populations of this species). Nevertheless, the species does still persist on these islands, albeit in localized areas with presumably small populations.

  2. I agree with Thomas Martin ” The re-assessment of this species (in light of recent taxonomic updates) as Critically Endangered is undoubtedly correct – the species remains an extremely high conservation priority. Perhaps even more so than before, given the relatively large population on Sumba is now split off as its own species.”
    On Sumba Island, trapping to supply the illegal trade is still the biggest threat for the population adding to that the continuous illegal logging of the already tiny fragments of forests left on this island is giving good predictions that the future, of the cockatoos and even the larger parrots and hornbills, is looking bleak.
    One more factor that is decimating the numbers rapidly too is the competition between species about the very few remaining decent nest cavities as most of the tall suitable nesting trees have already been logged.
    As mentioned above, this is an extremely high conservation priority.
    Few ideas that can be implemented on the island are:
    – Protecting the very small remaining wild population from trapping.
    – Protecting the remaining decent habitats from illegal logging.
    – Educating the locals on the value and uniqueness of these birds.
    – Establishing a breeding and release program to boost the population numbers. These cockatoos do breed well in captivity and training the rangers on how to shouldn’t be that complicated.
    If there is a will there is a way.

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