Archived 2021 topic: Madagascar Pratincole (Glareola ocularis): Revise global status?

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6 Responses to Archived 2021 topic: Madagascar Pratincole (Glareola ocularis): Revise global status?

  1. Paul Gacheru says:

    In Kenya, and especially in the Tana Delta where I have information from, in 2019, a survey recorded 1000+ individual birds for the first time. However, taking into account habitat suitability, a site like Tana Delta is under significant threat following competing for land uses which threatens suitable migratory habitats. I would recommend the retaining status at Vulnerable given that the range identified as Passage majority of these sites are highly threatened.

  2. Raphaël Nussbaumer says:

    Dear all,
    We (Colin Jackson and I) are currently working on gathering and analysing sightings of madagascar Pratincole in East Africa. You can find your preliminary data (https://github.com/A-Rocha-Kenya/MadPrat/blob/master/data/data.csv) and analysis (https://a-rocha-kenya.github.io/MadPrat/analysis/analysis.html) on the github repository https://a-rocha-kenya.github.io/MadPrat/.

    – the main regular wintering area are: Webbi Jubba river and more north in Somalia (but only very old records 1970-80s), Tana Delta and Sabaki (and in fewer number in Tanzania).
    – Inland records (6 records) are only of small number and irregular. I think the distribution range is to generous in Kenya.
    – Our preliminary analysis shows a declines but very hard to reliably confirmed and quantify with such scarse and irregular sightings/counts. Observation pressure and counting method might easily explain the differences. Some recent high count (3000 at tana delta in 2019, 3000 in 2010 and 2500 in 2020) are within the same range of the counts of the 70s-80s (with the exeption of the 9000 of 17/8/1978).

  3. Colin Jackson says:

    As Raphael has described above, data are indeed scattered and difficult to analyse with a number of records of large numbers being uncertain as to whether these were carried out by people who are familiar in counting large numbers of birds or not. The general trend observed in Kenya – which is the best covered part of the MP’s range – is that of a declining population. Interestingly, while there are perhaps not as many observers in Tanzania as Kenya, there are certainly enough to have produced records of MPs along the Tz coastline if indeed they were there. However, the pattern appears to be one where perhaps Mad Prats don’t really stop in Tanzania but prefer to overfly to reach Kenya – and then to push on to Somalia.

    The counts have been up to 3,000 birds in recent times – but it is uncertain as to whether the majority of the Mad Prats stay together or spread out along the coast in several flocks of 2,000-3,000. It would appear that they perhaps do not.

    Given the uncertainty of the actual number but on the other hand the quite clear indication of a declining population (and given the known reduction in suitable breeding habitat), it would be prudent to keep the status as Vulnerable and to encourage more detailed studies to better ascertain the status and movements of the Mad Prats on the East African coastline. Furthermore, there appears to be very few actual sites where the pratincoles are happy to settle on the ground and roost – a critical part of the daily cycle for the birds. Since they rely on so few sites for survival, it would be another reason to maintain the species status as ‘Vulnerable’.

  4. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Many thanks to everyone who has contributed to this discussion. We greatly appreciate the time and effort invested by so many people in commenting. The window for consultation is now closed. We will analyse and interpret the new information and post a preliminary decision on this species’s Red List status on this page in early July.

    Thank you once again,
    BirdLife Red List Team

  5. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Preliminary proposal

    Based on available information, our preliminary proposal for the 2021 Red List would be to adopt the proposed classifications outlined in the initial forum discussion.

    There is now a period for further comments until the final deadline in mid-July, after which the recommended categorisations will be put forward to IUCN.

    The final 2021 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in December 2021, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

  6. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Recommended categorisation to be put forward to IUCN

    The final categorisation for this species has not changed. Madagascar Pratincole is recommended to be listed as Near Threatened, approaching listing as threatened under Criterion C2a(ii).

    Many thanks for everyone who contributed to the 2021 GTB Forum process. The final 2021 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in December 2021, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

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