Black-throated Babbler (Stachyris nigricollis): Revise global status?

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3 Responses to Black-throated Babbler (Stachyris nigricollis): Revise global status?

  1. James Eaton says:

    Has there been anything published regarding the species being ‘abundant in plantations’ to justify the down listing?
    I’ve yet to encounter the species in 19 years of birding in Malaysia in any plantation away from lowland forest (albeit secondary forest but still with a well intact understorey).

  2. Ingkayut Sa-ar says:

    Khao Luang NP’s Krung Ching waterfall trail, Bang Lang NP’s Halasah Waterfall trail, and Hala-Bala WS are three conservation areas where the species has regularly been reported in Thailand.

    In addition, small population has sporadically recorded in Krabi province at Khao-Pra-Bang Kram & Khao-Kaew Khlong-Praya WS and Ban Nai Chong (Lowland Forest Fragments near Krabi town).

    There were specimens collected in Surat Thani and Satun province, but no recent records, indicating that its distribution in the peninsular Thailand used to be considerably wider.

    The biggest threat to the species’ habitat loss is the destruction of pristine lowland forest for growing rubber and oil palm in the peninsular Thailand over the last four decades.

  3. I strongly disagree in down-listing Black-throated Babbler. Populations of this formerly common species appeared to have been more heavily fragmented in Thailand through the loss of lowland forest. It has disappeared and possibly been extirpated from many sites owing to conversion of forest to plantations. The present distribution for the Thai part should be reduced to small patchy dots referring to locations mentioned above by Ingkayut.

    In 2005 it was assessed as nationally Vulnerable in Thailand by the ONEP: Office of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy and Planning (https://patricklepetit.jalbum.net/_FAUNA%20OF%20THAILAND/LIBRARY/Birds%20of%20Thailand.pdf).

    The situation has not gotten any better for all lowland forest species. Currently, it is listed as nationally Endangered by the ONEP and the BCST Records Committee (https://www.bcst.or.th/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Checklist_ThaiBirds_2020.xlsx).

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