Black Curassow (Crax alector): Revise global status?

This entry was posted in Americas, Galliformes, South America and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Black Curassow (Crax alector): Revise global status?

  1. Dan Brooks says:

    In light of the long generation time, low clutch size and survivorship (i.e., a K-selected bird species/genus), my gut says that LC is too risky, and NT might be safer if wanting to lower from VU.

  2. Richard-Hansen Cécile says:

    I agree with Dan Brooks’ comment. Even if Crax alector’s population may be healthy in fully undisturbed forests, they are very vulnerable to many kind of disturbance, owing to biological characteristics (see Dan Brooks’ comment) and behavior (easy to detect and kill). Moreover, the level of disturbance in inner part of the countries is poorly known, not only linked to deforestation (illegal goldmining is common in French Guiana, Guyana and Suriname). It is a very appreciated bushmeat everywhere.

    Estimated Black Curassow density ranged from 0.37 to 1.08 individuals/km2 across 10 hunted sites, and from 1.47 to 8.2 individuals km2 across 25 unhunted sites in French Guiana (Denis et al. 2016; 2018) .

    DENIS, T., HÉRAULT, B., BRUNAUX, O., GUITET, S., RICHARD-HANSEN, C. 2018 Weak environmental controls on the composition and diversity of medium and large-sized vertebrate assemblages in Neotropical rainforests of the Guiana Shield. Diversity and Distribution, 24: 1545-1559(details in appendix 4)

  3. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Many thanks to everyone who has contributed to this discussion. We greatly appreciate the time and effort invested by so many people in commenting. The window for consultation is now closed. We will analyse and interpret the new information and post a preliminary decision on this species’s Red List status on this page in early July.

    Thank you once again,
    BirdLife Red List Team

  4. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Preliminary proposal

    Based on available information, our preliminary proposal for the 2021 Red List would be to adopt the proposed classifications outlined in the initial forum discussion.

    Although ongoing deforestation is likely to be causing this species’s population to decline, the rate of deforestation over the past three generations has been low. This species may also be affected by disturbance and hunting, but it has always been hunted, and there is no evidence that the level of hunting is increasing substantially. Assuming that the population size declines in proportion to tree cover loss, that hunting may cause an equivalent population decline, and that disturbance may contribute an additional 50% of the decline caused by deforestation, the species’s suspected population reduction over the past three generations may be placed in the band 1-9%, and the suspected population reduction over the next three generations may be placed in the band 1-19%. On this basis, the species is assessed as Least Concern.

    There is now a period for further comments until the final deadline in late July, after which the recommended categorisations will be put forward to IUCN.

    The final 2021 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in December 2021, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

  5. Red List Team (BirdLife International) says:

    Recommended categorisation to be put forward to IUCN

    The final categorisation for this species has not changed. Black Curassow is recommended to be listed as Least Concern.

    Many thanks for everyone who contributed to the 2021 GTB Forum process. The final 2021 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in December 2021, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

Comments are closed.