Archived 2017 topics: Yellow-footed Honeyguide (Melignomon eisentrauti): request for information.

This discussion was first published as part of the 2016 Red List update. At the time a decision regarding its status was pended, but to enable potential reassessment of this species as part of the 2017 Red List update this post remained open and the date of posting was updated.

BirdLife species factsheet for Yellow-footed Honeyguide: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22680659

This species is recorded from several scattered sites across west Africa including Cameroon, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria. This species is relatively poorly known, with no population estimates. It is described as rare, but this may be in part due to under recording. It has a relatively small EOO, and habitat clearance and degradation is suspected to be causing a continuing decline in this species’s EOO, and AOO. While this species can tolerate disturbed habitat, it does appear mainly reliant on forest and so continuing forest destruction may cause population declines. It is currently listed as Data Deficient, but given the fact that our knowledge of this species is growing it may now warrant reassessment.

It is not currently thought to fulfil any criteria for a threatened category, but it is likely to be rare throughout its limited and scattered range, and if estimates of population size and trends become available it may then qualify for a threatened category. Dowsett-Lemaire and Dowsett (2014) suggested that it is best considered as Near Threatened. We request any further information for this species regarding its potential to be classified as Near Threatened on the basis of a population that may be moderately small and in decline, and additionally regarding its population and any potential threats and population trends.

Reference

Dowsett-Lemaire, F.; Dowsett, R. 2014. The Birds of Ghana: an atlas and handbook. Tauraco Press, Liège, Belgium

This entry was posted in Africa, Archive and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Archived 2017 topics: Yellow-footed Honeyguide (Melignomon eisentrauti): request for information.

  1. Hugo Rainey says:

    This species lives at low density and has been relatively rarely observed, in part because its vocalisations were not known until the last decade. As few observers are regularly active across much of its potential range, we are unlikely to learn much more about its distribution, abundance and ecology soon.
    A pragmatic assessment of its status would be to review rate of habitat loss and degradation (the main threat to is population) across its range. Forest is being lost at a high rate in the region through clearance and degradation, particularly Cote d’Ivoire (high levels of clearance since the start of the civil war in 2002) and Ghana (high levels of illegal logging which causes degradation). Other countries in its range are likely to have similar issues, in part because of continued human population growth and weak governance.
    Changes in habitat could provide a straightforward means of assessing red list status for this and many other species.

  2. James Westrip (BirdLife) says:

    Based on available information, our proposal for the 2016 Red List would be to pend the decision on this species and keep this discussion open until 2017, while leaving the current Red List category unchanged in the 2016 update.

    Final 2016 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in early December, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

  3. Andy Symes (BirdLife) says:

    Preliminary proposals

    Based on available information, our proposal for the 2017 Red List would be to list Yellow-footed Honeyguide as Near Threatened under criterion C2a(i).

    There is now a period for further comments until the final deadline of 4 August, after which the recommended categorisations will be put forward to IUCN.

    Final 2017 Red List categories will be published on the BirdLife and IUCN websites in early December, following further checking of information relevant to the assessments by both BirdLife and IUCN.

Comments are closed.